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P1457 Code – What Does It Mean & How To Fix It

This is one of the most frequent OBD2 trouble codes. Read the full article below to know what it means, how to fix it, and what other codes may show related to it.

Definition

The P1457 Code shows up when there is a problem detected on the canister side of a vehicle’s EVAP, or Evaporative Emissions Control system.

Meaning

Modern cars have an EVAP system installed. The function of this system is to help control an engine’s harmful emissions by capturing fuel vapor in a canister. This vapor is then drawn back into the engine to be reused. Not only does this help control emissions, it can also help regulate the engine’s temperature.

Modern cars have an EVAP system installed. The function of this system is to help control an engine’s harmful emissions by capturing fuel vapor in a canister. This vapor is then drawn back into the engine to be reused. Not only does this help control emissions, it can also help regulate the engine’s temperature.

EVAPs are incredibly complex systems, but in general they are broken down into two sides: the “canister” side which handles the fuel vapor after it is initially created after combustion, and the ‘tank” side which pushes the vapor back into the engine at the appropriate time.

The P1457 code refers specifically to a problem on the canister side of the EVAP system. Usually, it is in the form of a small leak around 2 mm or smaller – one that can be difficult to detect. When a leak on the canister side gets big enough, it starts to throw other codes. Therefore, if your car is showing only a P1457 code, it means most likely that a leak exists, but it is still relatively small.

It is also important to note that this particular code is brand-specific, and will only show up on certain vehicles. The most likely vehicle to throw this code is Honda, but there are other manufacturers that use this code, as well.

Causes

Because of the complex nature of an EVAP system, there are several different things that can cause this code. Although a small leak is a likely culprit (as mentioned above) it is certainly not the only possibility.

Other possible causes include stuck or corroded vent valves, a damaged canister fuel cap, a missing or misplaced gas cap, a failing sensor or a missing, damaged or defective EVAP canister

Symptoms

Usually, a problem in the EVAP system doesn’t result in any noticeable symptoms that can affect drivability. The most likely clue you’ll have that there is a problem is your check engine light turning on, which should immediately prompt you to get the problem diagnosed.

Depending on whether or not there is a leak you might also notice a faint but detectable smell of fuel while you are driving. Other than that, though, there are no symptoms of this automotive malfunction.

Diagnosis

Because of the complexity of the EVAP system, it can be difficult at times to correctly diagnose the problem. If it is a leak, it can be very difficult to find. Before that, though, there are other steps to take.

First, clear the code and run the car again to see whether the code reappears. If it does, also check to see if any other codes are thrown, especially if they relate to the EVAP system. Multiple codes can indicate a more serious problem.

If the code reappears, check your gas cap first to make sure it is on and secured properly. This is a very easy fix that happens a lot more than you would think!

Go over the vacuum lines in the EVAP system. Make sure you are on the canister side, as that is the side that P1457 indicates. Check for leaks, remembering that they are usually very, very small – no more than 2 mm in diameter. Feel around for weak spots or other damage that can’t be detected visually. 

Inspect the canister and fuel tank for any signs of damage. 

Inspect the canister vent valve for damage or corrosion. Obstructions in the vent valve can cause it to malfunction, which also triggers this code. It can also lead to moisture inside the EVAP system itself, which can damage the vehicle’s central monitoring systems. 

If you have done all of this and still cannot find the problem, or if you have replaced any damage found and the code still activates, it’s time to take it to a mechanic for professional advice.

Common mistakes

The good news is that, even though this can be a difficult problem to diagnose, once the problem is found it is often a relatively easy fix.

The biggest mistake people make when working on this code is that they go right to the difficult solution – trying to find a leak – instead of going through the easier steps first. Make sure you check caps and valves before beginning the more laborious task of combin over inch of the EVAP system to look for a small leak. This can save you time and money in the long run. 

How serious is this?

Overall, this problem is not serious by itself. The problem comes with leaving the issue untreated. If you have something like a leak, even a small one, it could grow and begin to trigger other issues, such as misfiring or worse. 

What repairs can fix the code?

  • To fix this issue, a few different repairs might be warranted.
  • If there is a damaged or misplaced gas cap, it needs to be replaced.
  • If a valve is damaged or corroded, it should be replaced.
  • If a leak is found in the EVAP system, the leak needs to be fixed by replacing the leaking part in question. 
  • If there is a torn hose, it should be replaced.

Related codes

There are two codes that are related to this problem, both dealing with the EVAP system:

P1452, which is defined as “unable to bleed up vacuum in tank” and

P1450, which means “unable to bleed up fuel tank vacuum.”