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P0607 Code – What Does It Mean & How To Fix It

This is one of the most frequent OBD2 trouble codes. Read the full article below to know what it means, how to fix it, and what other codes may show related to it.

Definition

P0607 - Control Module Performance Code typically refers to a vehicle's Control Module. Control Modules are responsible for handling various electronic functions including the system's anti-lock braking system, traction control system, electronic stability control, power steering assist and other advanced engine/transmission functions. When this code is set, the Control Module has detected a malfunction within itself.

Meaning

When this code is activated, the Control Module has determined that something is wrong with it. This implies there is a problem with the engine control module (ECM). According to the code, the ECM may be suffering issues such as power outages or memory loss, thus failing to perform its function effectively.

Causes

The following are common causes of this issue:

  • Damaged ECM / Corrupted ECM Data
  • Alternator is malfunctioning
  • Bad or Faulty Battery Cable(s)
  • Poor Connections in the Wiring System
  • ECM Replacement Required
  • Your battery is on its last legs or has expired.

Symptoms

The P0607 code will produce a Check Engine Light on the instrument panel/dash and will likely affect:

  • Power Steering Assist
  • Anti-Lock Braking System
  • Traction Control System
  • Electronic Stability Control
  • Engine / Transmission Controls

Affected areas such as Anti-Lock Brake System (ABS) and Traction Control will still function but will be less effective due to the malfunctioning ECM. Electronic Stability Control (ESC) is a safety system that uses your vehicle's brakes.

Diagnosis

P0607 is properly diagnosed with a scan tool capable of sensor readings (not just one from an auto parts store). A qualified technician can read the data from the scan tool to determine when the problem occurred, or if it is still occurring. They may clear the code/light and test drive the vehicle while monitoring data to see if it returns. If the code returns, then they will know there is still a malfunction. If it does not return, this indicates that the problem has been corrected and the issue is resolved.

Diagnosis may involve:

Conducting visual inspections for signs of faulty wiring or damage/corrosion to battery cables

Checking alternator function using an ammeter or voltage meter (12Volt / 10Amp) Alternators with a lower output may cause intermittent issues with the Control Module.

Replacing damaged/faulty components in wiring system – be sure to replace any parts with OEM units from a dealer – never put aftermarket parts on your vehicle as they often fail prematurely due to inferior manufacturing tolerances and materials, and may result in further damage to your vehicle.

Replacing the Control Module - A new ECM may need to be installed if the other components cannot be identified as the source of the issue. For example, if a bad battery cable was causing the problem, replacing that one part would fix it because now there is no damage to any other components due to this faulty cable.

Replacing or re-flashing the Control Module is often an expensive repair and does not guarantee it will fix the problem. Replacing a bad ECM is not a guarantee that the issue will be resolved either, especially if it was caused by a faulty battery cable or alternator.

Common mistakes

The following are common mistakes owners make when diagnosing this issue:

  • Replacing the ECM when other components could be causing the issue.
  • Not checking for damaged or corroded battery cables 
  • Failing to use OEM parts 
  • Not testing with proper diagnostic tools 
  • Not testing while driving for conditions that would cause symptoms 
  • Not testing for voltage drops in wiring

How serious is this?

This code can be a nuisance to owners, but not always a safety concern. Although it will affect the way your vehicle runs, no other issues should occur as a result of this issue unless you have poor or corroded wiring or a faulty alternator. If you have a poor battery cable or alternator, this may be the reason for the P0607 code and is something that needs to be fixed. 

If left unattended, too much damage can be done to your vehicle's wiring system and it may result in more costly repairs later.

What repairs can fix the code?

Replacing the Control Module - A new ECM may need to be installed if the other components cannot be identified as the source of the issue. For example, if a bad battery cable was causing the problem, replacing that one part would fix it because now there is no damage to any other components due to this faulty cable.

Replacing or re-flashing the Control Module is often an expensive repair and does not guarantee it will fix the problem. Replacing a bad ECM is not a guarantee that the issue will be resolved either, especially if it was caused by a faulty battery cable or alternator.

Replacing damaged/faulty components in the wiring system – be sure to replace any parts with OEM units from a dealer – never put aftermarket parts on your vehicle as they often fail prematurely due to inferior manufacturing tolerances and materials, and may result in further damage to your vehicle.

Conducting visual inspections for signs of faulty wiring or damage/corrosion to battery cables 

Testing alternator function using an ammeter or voltage meter (12Volt / 10Amp) Alternators with a lower output may cause intermittent issues with the Control Module. 

Related codes

The P0607 code could be accompanied by several other codes including P0121, P0122, P0123, P0420, P0505

How much does it cost to fix the P0607 code?

A new Control Module could be as much as $500. 

Replacing a bad Control Module is not a guarantee that the issue will be resolved either, especially if it was caused by a faulty battery cable or alternator.

The costs of replacing damaged wiring components can be expensive but may save you from further damage later on due to poor wiring/electrical connections. 

If your vehicle does have severe electrical damage due to corrosion or water damage, this would most likely indicate there is more serious internal damage and would need professional assistance from a mechanic/technician to diagnose it properly and accurately.

Conclusion

The P0607 code is most frequently caused by a faulty battery cable or alternator and the related components in your vehicle's wiring system. Replacing these parts will usually solve the problem; replacement parts should always be OEM (original equipment manufacturer) units to ensure they work properly with all of your vehicle's components and do not damage anything else due to poor manufacturing tolerances.

If you have tried replacing bad components in your wiring system and the issue is still occurring, it could indicate that there is more serious internal damage such as corrosion or water damage that would require professional assistance from a mechanic/technician to diagnose it properly and accurately. 

To prevent this issue from happening further down the road, we recommend having your battery cables checked regularly for signs of corrosion or any damage. 

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